Behaviour Studies Could Enhance Simulator Capabilities

21 April 2009 (Last Updated April 21st, 2009 18:30)

Scientists in the US Defence Department's Modelling and Simulation Coordination Office (MSCO) are looking to improve irregular warfare techniques by studying human social and cultural behaviours. The MSCO believes that while challenging to understand the human social and cultural behav

Scientists in the US Defence Department's Modelling and Simulation Coordination Office (MSCO) are looking to improve irregular warfare techniques by studying human social and cultural behaviours.

The MSCO believes that while challenging to understand the human social and cultural behaviour aspects of modelling and simulation could be very beneficial as a means to meet national security challenges.

MSCO's deputy director, Army Col. Michael Sanders said that a major technological challenge of the 21st century was to learn how to combine knowledge about standard conventional warfare with social sciences applications.

"Anybody who's been in the military knows that we're very good at modelling and using simulation to look at the kinetic effects of conventional warfare," said Sanders.

"Understanding some of the algorithms and some of the technologies dealing with human social and cultural behaviour, however, is something we're we're just starting to find out about."

In addition to irregular warfare MSCO experts are studying how modelling and simulation tools can help with proprietary technology, the notion of systems within a system engineering environment and protecting the cyberspace domain.

By Daniel Garrun.