Kongsberg wins contract to supply parts for F-35 JSF programme

11 July 2019 (Last Updated July 11th, 2019 15:54)

Kongsberg Defence & Aerospace has received a new contract from Lockheed Martin Aeronautics to provide equipment for the global F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) Program.

Kongsberg wins contract to supply parts for F-35 JSF programme
Kongsberg will supply rudders, vertical leading edges and main landing gear closeout panels for the F-35 aircraft. Credit: © Kongsberg Group.

Kongsberg Defence & Aerospace has received a contract from Lockheed Martin Aeronautics to provide equipment for the global F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) Program.

The contract is for the supply of rudders, vertical leading edges and main landing gear closeout panels for all three versions of the F-35 aircraft.

The equipment will be supplied for more than 500 aircraft covering production lots 12-14.

Kongsberg won orders worth around Nkr700m ($81.21m) in previous quarters for the JSF programme.

Commenting on the latest order, Kongsberg Defence & Aerospace president Eirik Lie said: “This contract confirms Kongsberg’s strong and long-term position in the F-35 programme.

“The F-35 programme will produce aircraft for many years to come. This order secures continuous production at Kongsberg’s factory, and just as important, paves the way for future contracts.”

In June last year, the company received a Nkr525m ($60.9m) order for deliveries of aircraft structural parts covering more than 150 F-35s under the LRIP 11 production lot.

The firm also secured two contracts in February 2018 to provide air-to-air pylons and centre fuselage parts for the programme.

The F-35 programme provides the aircraft in three different variants. Each of the variants is designated for the US Air Force, US Navy, and US Marine Corps.

Lockheed Martin also supplies the F-35 combat aircraft to US allied nations and partners, including Australia, Japan, the UK and Italy.

The aircraft features stealth technology, advanced sensors, supersonic speed, weapons capacity and superior range.

Last month, the US Department of Defense reached an agreement with Lockheed Martin to reduce the per-unit cost of the F-35s.

The agreement covers more than 470 aircraft over lots 12-14.