RAAF deploys 14 aircraft for Exercise Red Flag in US

21 January 2016 (Last Updated January 21st, 2016 18:30)

The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) has deployed 14 aircraft to the Exercise Red Flag 16-1, at Nellis Air Force Base in Nevada, US.

The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) has deployed 14 aircraft to the Exercise Red Flag 16-1, at Nellis Air Force Base in Nevada, US.

The exercise being held from 19 January to 13 February will see participation of 410 personnel from RAAF.

Red Flag 16-1 will involve a battlespace recreation to enable the air force personnel to display their abilities in a deployed scenario.

"The threats they face range from aggressor F-15 and F-16 fighters and simulated surface to air missile engagements, through to electronic warfare and cyberspace attacks."

No. 81 Wing and Exercise director and commanding officer Group Captain Phil Gordon said: "Exercise Red Flag involves a series of air combat scenarios that test operational air and ground crews to the highest level.

"For members of the RAAF, this exercise is the culmination of years of training; it is incredibly challenging and the ultimate test of coalition interoperability."

RAAF has deployed six F/A-18F Super Hornet twin-engine carrier-based multirole fighter aircraft, six F/A-18 A/B Hornet aircraft and an AP-3C Orion equipped with features to track down and sink enemy submarines using torpedoes and Harpoon anti-ship missiles, and an E-7A Wedgetail AEW&C.

A group of Air Battle Management element from No. 41 Wing, conducting surveillance and battlespace management for coalition forces, will also join the exercise.

"Day and night-time missions at Red Flag will require large numbers of aircraft to work together to complete the assigned mission across a variety of roles.

"The threats they face range from aggressor F-15 and F-16 fighters and simulated surface to air missile engagements, through to electronic warfare and cyberspace attacks."

"It provides the ultimate environment in which our Air Force personnel can showcase their extraordinary abilities in a deployed scenario." Gordon added.