Millennium Space Systems commences integration of USAF’s WFOV testbed

15 February 2016 (Last Updated February 15th, 2016 18:30)

Millennium Space Systems has commenced integration of the US Air Force's (USAF) wide field of view (WFOV) spacecraft bus platform.

Millennium Space Systems has commenced integration of the US Air Force's (USAF) wide field of view (WFOV) spacecraft bus platform.

The latest development is part of a contract awarded to the company by the US Space and Missile Systems Center (SMC).

US SMC WFOV Testbed programme manager lieutenant colonel Michelle Villavaso said: "The team has made outstanding progress on the WFOV spacecraft bus development.

"This is a critical milestone for the Air Force's WFOV programme and Space Modernisation efforts to enhance the capabilities of the current Space Based Infrared System enterprise."

"This is a critical milestone for the Air Force's WFOV programme and Space Modernisation efforts to enhance the capabilities of the current Space Based Infrared System enterprise."

Managed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Ames Research Center, the process will involve the mid-sized Geosynchronous spacecraft based on Millennium's Aquila M8 affordable platform series hosting an overhead persistent infrared (OPIR) 6-degree staring sensor that is currently being developed under a separate contract.

The company will functionally integrate, test and prepare for sensor integration of the spacecraft programme.

This demonstration will provide critical risk reduction for Air Force Space Command's next generation missile warning system.

Millennium Space System WFOV Testbed programme manager Dr Ryan Lawrence said: "This has been a team effort with our Air Force SMC and Nasa Ames Customers, the Aerospace Corporation, and our Millennium development crew.

"I'm proud of our team's achievement in getting to this point, but we're keeping our eyes on the prize, and that means successfully delivering and operating the spacecraft on orbit, on time, and on budget."