France delivers Dassault-built Rafale to Egypt

28 January 2016 (Last Updated January 28th, 2016 18:30)

France's Dassault Aviation has delivered the second batch of Rafale multirole combat fighter to the Egyptian Air Force (EAF).

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France's Dassault Aviation has delivered the second batch of Rafale multirole combat fighters to the Egyptian Air Force (EAF).

Three more aircraft were delivered as part of a $5bn deal signed between the company and the Arab Republic of Egypt in February 2015 for the supply of 24 Rafale fighter aircraft.

France will also supply an FREMM frigate to Egypt as part of the deal.

An Egyptian spokesman was quoted by Business-Standard as saying: "The new fighter jets represent a massive addition to the fleet of the Egyptian air forces."

The latest acquisition, which brings a total of six aircraft to the EAF's fleet, is expected to increase the military capabilities of the Middle Eastern country in the midst of ongoing tumult in the neighbouring states including Syria, Iraq and Libya.

Last week, France and India signed an intergovernmental agreement for the purchase of the combat aircraft.

Under the agreement, France will supply 36 Rafale fighter jets to India as part of the long-awaited medium multi-role combat aircraft (MMRCA) contract.

"The new fighter jets represent a massive addition to the fleet of the Egyptian air forces."

Powered by two SNECMA M88 engines, Rafale is a delta-wing multi-role jet fighter designed to conduct air-to-air combat, reconnaissance flights and nuclear bombing missions.

The aircraft is capable of carrying anti-ship and air-to-air and air-to-ground missiles.

The company is planning to continuously improve the aircraft to meet the operational requirements in future.

Currently the air forces of India, Canada, Malaysia and UAE operate the fighter aircraft.

Egypt has also ordered for the supply of Ka-52 Alligator Military Helicopters from Russia, which is expected to be delivered in 2017.


Image: Three aircraft were delivered as part of a $5bn deal signed in 2015. Photo: courtesy of Patrick Rogel.