USAF awards MALD decoy missiles production contract to Raytheon

1 August 2018 (Last Updated August 1st, 2018 12:40)

Raytheon has been awarded a $96.1m contract by the US Air Force (USAF) for the production of Miniature Air-Launched Decoys (MALD) missiles.

USAF awards MALD decoy missiles production contract to Raytheon
Raytheon’s MALD-J decoy variant. Credit: PRNewsfoto / Raytheon.

Raytheon has been awarded a $96.1m contract by the US Air Force (USAF) for the production of Miniature Air-Launched Decoys (MALD) missiles.

A total of 250 MALD systems will be developed for the USAF under the contract.

The contract has been awarded by the USAF just prior to the delivery of the 2,000th MALD missile system carried out by Raytheon.

Raytheon air warfare systems vice-president Mike Jarrett said: “MALD gives fighter pilots control of the skies, so they can stay out of harm’s way.

“MALD decoy missiles can travel at a range of approximately 500nm and fly a pre-programmed mission after the system is launched from its host aircraft.”

“We’re at the leading edge of electronic warfare, to defeat the most advanced air defence systems.”

Currently, the USAF has completed aircraft integration of the MALD decoy missiles and the US Navy is planning to install the system on to its aircraft fleet.

MALD is an air-launched missile, which features both decoy and jamming capabilities that have the capability to electronically stimulate and neutralise enemy integrated air defence systems (IADS).

The low-cost, programmable system can be used to accurately duplicate the combat flight profiles and signatures of the US aircraft, as well as the jets deployed with other allied nations.

Weighing less than 300lb, MALD decoy missiles can travel at a range of approximately 500nm and fly a pre-programmed mission after the system is launched from its host aircraft.

Currently, the company is manufacturing MALD-J decoy, the unmanned jammer variant of the standard model.

The missile will be able to navigate and operate much closer to the victim radar than conventional electronic warfare when jamming the electronics, allowing pilots and aircraft to remain safe.