US Air National Guard fires Lockheed’s laser guided training rounds from F-16

26 July 2016 (Last Updated July 26th, 2016 18:30)

A US Air National Guard (ANG) unit has successfully fired eight Lockheed Martin enhanced laser guided training rounds (ELGTR) for the first time.

A US Air National Guard (ANG) unit has successfully fired eight Lockheed Martin enhanced laser guided training rounds (ELGTR) for the first time.

The ELGTR were fired from the unit's F-16C/D Block 40/42 aircraft during recent flight evaluations at Barry M. Goldwater Ranges near Gila Bend, Arizona, US.

The successful release marks the completion of the rounds' evaluation on the aircraft.

The training rounds replicate the performance and laser engagement requirements of Paveway II laser guided bombs (LGB), Lockheed said in a statement.

During firing, its high-reliability and accuracy were demonstrated while being flown under various mission conditions and the rounds' accuracy was within 3m.

Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control precision guided systems director Joe Serra said: “ELGTR is already in use on several allies’ F-16s, and allows pilots to train without expending tactical inventory, thereby reducing training costs.

“Adding ELGTR to the ANG’s training programme gives them a cost-effective and flexible capability for providing operational instruction of Paveway II LGB employment.”

"Adding ELGTR to the ANG’s training programme gives them a cost-effective and flexible capability for providing operational instruction of Paveway II LGB employment."

Said to be the only live-fire LGB training solution for warfighters, the ELGTR (BDU-59B/B) can be used on F/A-18, AV-8B, F-16 and various international aircraft.

Lockheed Martin's facility in Archbald, Pennsylvania, produces ELGTR and combat-proven Paveway II Plus LGB kits.

To date, the company has delivered more than 150,000 laser guided training rounds, 75,000 LGB kits and 7,000 dual mode LGB kits to the US Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force and 23 international customers.


Image: The wing of the F-16C/D Block 40/42 aircraft. Photo: courtesy of Lockheed Martin Corporation.