Boeing secures $855m T-38C aircraft logistics support contract

5 January 2016 (Last Updated January 5th, 2016 18:30)

Boeing has secured an $855m contract to provide avionics component integration and contractor logistics support for the US Air Force's (USAF) T-38C aircraft.

T-38C_cockpit.jpg

Boeing has secured an $855m contract to provide avionics component integration and contractor logistics support for the US Air Force's (USAF) T-38C aircraft.

The contract will see Boeing carry out work at its facility in Louis, Missouri; and Air Force and Navy bases located in Texas, Mississippi, Maryland, and Oklahoma, US.

Work under the contract is expected to be completed by 3 January 2026. The US Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Hill Air Force Base, Utah, will serve as the contracting activity.

Built by Northrop Grumman, the T-38CTalon is a two-seat, supersonic jet trainer used by the Air Education Training Command as an advanced trainer for specialised undergraduate pilot training.

The aircraft is also operated by the US Navy and Nasa, as well as the armed forces of Germany, South Korea, Taiwan and Turkey.

In March, the USAF had contracted CPI Aerostructures to provide structural modification kits for the T-38C Pacer Classic III (PC III) aircraft structural modification programme.

"It will see the firm supply 74 modification kits in support of the Phase II of the modification programme."

The $49m indefinite-delivery / indefinite-quantity contract was awarded by the Air Force Life Cycle Management Center. It will see the firm supply 74 modification kits in support of the Phase II of the modification programme.

Specifically, CPI Aero will provide the necessary integration of kits, programme management, logistics, discrepancy reporting / resolution, as well as sub-contract management.

The USAF plans to award a contract for 350 new two-seat jet trainers, T-X, to replace the ageing T-38 Talon fleet in autumn 2017, with initial operational capability by the end of 2023.

In March 2015, USAF officials released requirements for the T-X trainer aircraft family of systems.


Image: T-38C cockpit. Photo courtesy: US Navy / Wikipedia.