CAE and KF Aerospace to establish JV for pilot training in Canada

4 May 2018 (Last Updated May 4th, 2018 12:04)

Canadian military pilot and aircrew training providers CAE and KF Aerospace have teamed up to establish a joint venture (JV), SkyAlyne Canada.

Canadian military pilot and aircrew training providers CAE and KF Aerospace have teamed up to establish a joint venture (JV), SkyAlyne Canada.

The 50/50 JV will focus on the development and supply of advanced military pilot and aircrew training in the country.

KF Aerospace chief executive officer Barry Lapointe said: “SkyAlyne will build on Canada’s proud heritage started during World War II as an international leader in military aircrew training, and we look forward to working with CAE through the SkyAlyne JV to develop next-generation pilot and aircrew training solutions in Canada.”

The two companies currently provide all phases of pilot training to the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF).

“The new JV will focus on developing synergies between the two programmes and ensure that the Canadian Air Force has access to better training.”

The training is delivered through CAE-managed Nato Flying Training in Canada (NFTC) programme and the Contracted Flying Training and Support (CFTS) programme managed by KF Aerospace.

The new JV will focus on developing synergies between the two programmes and ensure that the Canadian Air Force has access to better training that would help meet current and future needs.

CAE president and chief executive officer Marc Parent said: “The union of our two companies through the SkyAlyne Canada JV brings together proven expertise in all phases of pilot training, and helps ensure this key industrial capability can be developed and delivered by Canadian companies for Canada.

“SkyAlyne Canada will draw on the resources and experience of both CAE and KF Aerospace, along with many industry partners in our supply chain across the country, to design and develop innovative pilot and aircrew training solutions that can meet the current and future training needs of Canada and our allies.”