Schiebel selects Leonardo’s PicoSAR radar for Camcopter S-100 UAS


Italian company Leonardo has been chosen by Austria-based Schiebel to provide its active electronically-scanned array (AESA) radar technology, PicoSAR, for the Camcopter S-100 unmanned air system (UAS).

Schiebel’s Camcopter S-100 UAS will be delivered to the armed forces of a North African country.

PicoSAR, which is slated to be delivered and enter into operations this year, will be used to conduct border-monitoring,as well as anti-terrorism surveillance missions.

The system features latest ‘electronically-scanning’ AESA technology integrated into a small and lightweight unit that is best suited for use in unmanned vehicles and can be used for missions both over land and on sea.

Recently, Leonardo’s SW4-Solo unmanned rotorcraft and Camcopter S-100 UAS, both featuring AESA radars and electronic warfare systems, have been demonstrated at the UK Ministry of Defence’s major UAS trial demonstration, Unmanned Warrior.

The trial showed that the sensors not only have the capability to extend surveillance of naval vessels but can also enhance situational awareness.

Designed and developed in the UK, Leonardo’s PicoSAR radar has been flown in Oceania, the Middle East, the Far East, North Africa, North America, Europe and South America.

"The trial showed that the sensors not only have the capability to extend surveillance of naval vessels but can also enhance situational awareness."

Being part of the company’s portfolio of airborne surveillance and fire-control radars, PicoSAR includes mechanically-scanning (M-Scan) systems, in addition to electronically scanning (E-Scan) systems.

This is the second time that Schiebel has selected Leonardo’s PicoSAR radar technology, while the first was for a surveillance service contract.

In addition to PicoSAR, Leonardo is also promoting its Osprey 30 radar and SAGE system to Australia as sensor options for the UAS, which the Royal Australian Navy selected in December last year.


Image: Leonardo’s active electronically-scanned array radar, PicoSAR. Photo: courtesy of Leonardo.