Lockheed tests JASSM with updated GPS anti-jam hardware and software


Lockheed Martin has conducted two product verification flight tests of its updated joint air-to-surface standoff missile (JASSM) aboard B-2 and B-52 bomber aircraft.

The tests demonstrate the ability of the missile's updated Global Positioning System (GPS) anti-jam hardware and software.

During the tests conducted at White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico, the long-range, air-to-ground missiles launched at altitudes more than 24,000ft navigated to and destroyed their intended targets.

Testing validated the effective operation of JASSM in both GPS-degraded and non-jammed environments, Lockheed stated.

Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control long-range strike systems programme director Jason Denney said: "JASSM is effective in a variety of challenging mission environments.

"With these JASSM product updates, we continue to provide a wide range of affordable options that ensure a tactical advantage for US and allied warfighters."

The JASSM and JASSM-Extended Range (ER) have been designed to engage high-value, well-defended, fixed and relocatable targets in all weather conditions.

These missiles are equipped with a penetrating blast-fragmentation warhead and an infrared seeker to dial into specific points on targets.

"The JASSM and JASSM-Extended Range (ER) have been designed to engage high-value, well-defended, fixed and relocatable targets in all weather conditions."

The JASSM-ER is said to have more than two-and-a-half times the range of JASSM for greater standoff distance.

According to the company, the JASSM’s standoff range protects aircrews from hostile air defence systems.

The missiles have been fitted into a variety of the US Air Force (USAF) aircraft such as B-1B, B-2, B-52, F-16 and F-15E.


Image: A Lockheed Martin JASSM missile closes in on a target during a test. Photo: courtesy of Lockheed Martin Corporation.