Global Defence Technology: Issue 64

In this issue: Australia’s shifting defence spending priorities, military innovation made in Japan, the next stage of the British-French Future Combat Air System project, modernising IT for the UK MoD, what’s next for the Successor submarine programme and more.


Global Defence Technology

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In its most recent defence budget, the Australian Government announced an increase in defence spending of an additional $29.9bn over the next decade. We take a look at the country's defence spending priorities and ask how they reflect the changing range of security concerns Australia is facing at home and abroad.

Also in this issue, we look into the £1.54bn joint effort between Britain and France to develop a prototype for the Future Combat Air System, ask how far the UK Ministry of Defence's further funding for the Successor submarine programme will go, and explore the strategic reasons behind Japan's recent push into arms manufacturing.

Plus, we talk to Fujitsu about its work to modernise the UK MoD's communications infrastructure, and delve into the history of cryptography and its potential in the age of cyber warfare.

Read the issue for free on your iPad through our app, or if you're on a desktop computer you can also read it in our web viewer.

In this issue

East Asia's Power Shift
Nestling in Australia's latest Defence White Paper are clear signs that developments in the Asia-Pacific region are not going the way Canberra had hoped. Dr Gareth Evans finds out more.
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Japan's Weapons of War
There is a Japanese saying that 'business is war' and now, after the recent easing of restrictions on foreign arms sales, it seems Prime Minister Shinzo Abe is hoping that the materiel of war can also become business. Dr Gareth Evans reports.
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Guardians of Information
In 2015 two major contracts marked a fifty year relationship between the UK Ministry of Defence and Fujitsu. Claire Apthorp takes a look at how Fujitsu is contributing to today's modern military.
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FCAS: An Unmanned Future
The UK and France have announced a £1.54bn project to build a prototype of the Future Combat Air System. Claire Apthorp takes a closer look at the next-generation UAV programme.
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Succeeding with Successor
The UK Ministry of Defence has confirmed a further £642m of funding for the Successor submarine programme. With the assessment phase totalling £3.9bn and opposition remaining strong, Claire Apthorp asks, how feasible is the endeavour?
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Cracking the Code
The use of cryptography as a means of secure communication dates back nearly 4,000 years. The US Navy has been using it for over 80 years, and will as Gareth Evans finds out, rely on it for years to come.
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Next issue

Project CameraShy spent years investigating Chinese hacking groups and cyber espionage associated with the Chinese People's Liberation Army. We find out more about the workings of the mysterious Unit 78020 and the implications of their recently published report.

Also in the next issue, we look at the Nordic Defense Cooperation's collaborative approach to defence procurement and ask whether it could become a model that can be replicated elsewhere, and round up innovative developments in lightweight vehicle armour.

Plus, we find out what SpaceX's breakthrough victory over ULA for a US Air Force national security satellite launch will mean for the future of the market, and we investigate the technological faults that have been plaguing the British Navy's Type 45 destroyers.

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