Global Defence Technology: Issue 56

In this issue: Why exercise Jade Helm caused controversy in the US, a look inside the BFBS, decision time for the US Air Force’s long-range strike bomber, extending drone range with hydrogen fuel cells, the US Navy’s NIFC-CA capacity rolls out, and more.


Global Defence Technology

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The US Army's recent Jade Helm exercise, which included special forces training to work covertly on US soil, stoked controversy and enraged conspiracy theorists. Looking beyond the paranoia, we investigate what the reaction to the exercise tells us about the militarisation of the domestic space and the government's relationship with the governed.

We also take a look at the contenders for the US Long Range Strike Bomber programme to find out which company is best placed to meet the air force's requirements, explore the potential of hydrogen energy as an alternative power source for UAVs, and ask how the UK Dstl and Qintiq are collaborating to tackle health risks faced by jet pilots. Moreover, we review the highlights from this year's DSEI exhibition, take a look behind the scenes at the British Forces Broadcasting Service and check in on the roll-out of the US Navy's Naval Integrated Fire Control-Counter Air system.

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In this issue

DSEI: Tech & Deals
From big names and big deals to innovative tech from small businesses, Claire Apthorp reviews the highlights from this year's Defence and Security Equipment International exhibition.
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Concerns and Conspiracies
The US Army's recent Jade Helm exercise stoked controversy and enraged conspiracy theorists. Dr Gareth Evans asks what the reaction to the exercise says about the militarisation of the domestic space and the government's relationship with the governed.
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More than Entertainment
The British Forces Broadcasting Service aims to be the 'glue' that holds the British forces community together. Claire Apthorp takes a look behind the scenes.
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Ready, Set...
With the contract announcement for the US Air Force's new long-range bomber expected soon, Claire Apthorp takes a look at hints dropped to date to find out which contender is best placed to succeed.
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Power Up
As hydrogen storage specialist Cella and manufacturer Israel Aerospace Industries prepare to design and build a hydrogen-powered drone, Claire Apthorp looks into hydrogen energy as an alternative power source for unmanned aerial vehicles
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Protecting Aircrew
Flying a military jet comes with a host of complex risks. Claire Apthorp finds out how a research project by the UK's Dstl and QinetiQ is working to protect pilots' health and wellbeing.
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Over the Horizon
As the US Navy's Naval Integrated Fire Control-Counter Air system begins to roll out, Dr Gareth Evans asks how the system will improve the navy's effective reach and strike capability.
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Next issue preview

The merger of Nexter and KMW has been described a game-changer for the armoured vehicle sector in Europe, creating a Franco-German armoured systems giant with revenues of around €2bn per year. With interest in armoured vehicles picking up again in Europe in the wake of the Ukraine crisis, and new markets in Asia Pacific, South America, the Middle East and North Africa offering new growth opportunities, we ask how the deal will position the new giant to compete in the global market and what the impact will be on its European rivals.

We also investigate how the US military will keep up with the US Pentagon's plan to increase the number of ISR drone flights by almost 50% by 2019 at a time when fleets and operators are already stretched, and take a look back at the rise and fall of the Humvee as Oshkosh gears up to replace the US Army's iconic vehicle. Moreover, we review Australia's 20-year plan to save its shipbuilding industry with a $89bn investment in domestically built naval ships and submarines, and take a look at a range of futuristic designs unveiled in the UK that show how the Royal Navy could sail in 2050.

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