DiSTI to develop F-16 virtual maintenance trainer for undisclosed customer


F-16 fighter

DiSTI has been awarded a contract for the development of a virtual maintenance trainer for an undisclosed international air force's F-16C Block 52 Fighting Falcon aircraft.
 
The trainer developed under the contract will be designed to improve training initiatives of the fighter aircraft, while effectively reducing the overall training costs.
 
Using the latest technologies, the virtual maintenance trainer is expected to boost traditional training for F-16 crew members, eventually ensuring that the aircraft always remains combat ready, which is critical for mission success.
 
DiSTI Global Sales & Support director Christopher Giordano said the contract represents a significant step forward in expanding the advanced training of an aircraft that has protected dozens of countries for more than 30 years.
 
''The international customer is a visionary among the F-16 platform owners for recognising the immense benefits of applying advanced virtual training technologies so this critical fighter can continue to serve their country,'' Giordano said.
 
DiSTI's intuitive virtual maintenance training environment (VMTE) immerses the student into the training scenario with easy to-use controls, which reduces the amount of time required for effective operation of the trainer.
 
The contract's value, performance period and additional details, including delivery schedule, remain undisclosed.
 
Manufactured by Lockheed Martin, the F-16 was initially designed as an air superiority day fighter, but later evolved into a successful all-weather multirole aircraft for accurate delivery of ordnance during non-visual bombing conditions.
 
The single Pratt & Whitney F-100-GE-129 turbofan engine-powered aircraft initially entered service with the US Air Force (USAF) in 1978, and is currently operational with 26 countries worldwide, including Israel, Egypt, New Zealand, South Korea, Chile, Poland, UAE, Bahrain, Greece and Singapore.


Image: A USAF's F-16C Fighting Falcon aircraft disengages from a refuelling boom. Photo: courtesy of USAF Smsg John P Rohrer.

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