US approves sale of AT-6C Wolverine aircraft to Tunisia

27 February 2020 (Last Updated February 27th, 2020 15:50)

The US State Department has approved the sale of four AT-6C Wolverine light attack aircraft and associated equipment to Tunisia.

The US State Department has approved the sale of four AT-6C Wolverine light attack aircraft and associated equipment to Tunisia.

Approved under the foreign military sale route, the aircraft and its supporting equipment are valued at approximately $325.8m.

US Congress has been notified of the sale by the Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA).

Tunisia has requested the delivery of 312 MAU-169 computer control groups (CCG), 312 MXU-1006/B air foil groups (AFG), 468 MK81 250 LB GP bombs, 18BDU-50s, 66 MXU-650 C/B Air Foil Groups and GBU-10,12,16.

Other equipment included in the sale package is guided bombs, MAU-209, 48 MK-82 500lb bombs, 516 FMU-152 A/B fuses, 18 MAU-169H (D-2)/B computer control groups and 3,290 Advanced Precision Kill Weapon Systems (APKWS).

Additionally, Tunisia will receive two Pratt & Whitney PT6A-68D 1600 SHP engines, six L-3 WESCAM MX 15D multi-spectral targeting system, cartridge actuated device (CAD) or Propellant Actuated Device (PAD), explosive warheads and six machine guns calibre .50.

Textron Aviation Defense is serving as the prime contractor for the deal.

In a statement, DSCA said: “This proposed sale will support the foreign policy and national security of the United States by helping to improve the defence capabilities and capacity of a major non-Nato ally, which is an important force for political stability and economic progress in North Africa.

“This potential sale will provide additional opportunities for bilateral engagements and further strengthen the bilateral relationship between the United States and Tunisia.”

With the AT-6 aircraft, the country will be capable of improved countering of existing and future threats while bolstering interoperability with regional allies.

Wolverine is a multi-mission aircraft system designed to meet the needs of close air support and light attack missions.