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January 20, 2020updated 26 Jun 2020 6:09am

Is China leading the AI arms race? New issue of Global Defence Technology out now

In this issue: Why China could gain an edge in the AI arms race, how the UAE’s new defence conglomerate aims to take on the global market, advances in soldier tech from head to toe, dumb vs smart military robots, and more.

By Susanne Hauner

Global Defence Technology is back for another issue packed with industry news and analysis. In this issue we find out why China’s advances in military AI are causing concern in the US and Europe, take a look at the UAE’s new EDGE defence conglomerate, check out the latest in soldier gear, and more.

Free Report
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What is driving and impacting South Korea’s Defense Market?

South Korea’s defense budget is currently valued at $48.3 billion after experiencing impressive and robust annual growth of 10.5% in 2022. Over the forecast period, South Korean defense expenditure is anticipated to register a strong CAGR of 6.3% over 2023-27 and reach $66.2 billion by 2027. The country’s acquisition budget, which includes research and development (R&D) funding, is also anticipated to register significant growth, projected to reach $21.6 billion in 2027, seeing significant rise from the anticipated $17 billion in 2023. South Korean defense spending is continuing to be fueled by the country’s hostile relationship with North Korea, coupled with the need to develop its own domestic industry. If you want to strategize successfully off this growing market, it is important to be fully informed. This report’s key findings include:
  • Details on the defense budget
  • Drivers of defense spending
  • Key trends impacting the market
Download the full report so you can formulate winning strategies for the road ahead.
by GD50 ADS
Enter your details here to receive your free Report.

China has invested heavily to implement AI in defence applications, making rapid progress by leveraging its control of research and industry – to the point where the US is getting concerned about being leapfrogged. We ask whether traditional powers in the West can keep up in the AI arms race.

The UAE has brought 25 defence companies into the EDGE conglomerate, creating a domestic defence giant. We take a look at the new company, its market potential and the strategy behind the UAE’s decision to create a home-grown defence powerhouse.

Also in this issue, we learn how the long-established military technique of deception can be used in the cyber domain to outsmart opponents, ask whether the future of military robotics lies in autonomous machines or those designed to follow simple orders, check out the latest systems for soldiers from head to toe, and revisit the long history of the B-52 Stratofortress.

In this issue

Will a new domestic defence giant give the UAE an edge in the global market?

In an effort to wean itself from Western dependence the UAE has folded together 25 companies into one domestic defence giant, EDGE. Harry Lye explores the strategy behind the new company and asks whether the Middle East’s homegrown powerhouse can crack the international defence market. Read the article.

The AI arms race is on – and China might take the lead

Beijing is rapidly gaining an edge in the development of military artificial intelligence (AI) technology by leveraging its control over domestic research facilities. Harry Lye finds out what the country’s progress means for rivals such as the US, and why winning the AI arms race matters. Read the article.

How to catch cyber attackers with traditional military deception

Tony Cole, CTO of Attivo Networks, NASA Advisory Council member and (ISC)² board member, tells Harry Lye how traditional military deception techniques can be adapted for the digital domain to combat cybersecurity threats. Read the interview.

Dumb or smart? The future of military robots

As armies look to advance their use of robots, they are faced with the choice of either developing ‘dumb’ software able to follow human instructions, or ‘smart’ technology that can carry out tasks autonomously. Both systems raise questions, as Ross Davies reports. Read the article.

Head to toe: the latest in soldier clothing and equipment

The modern soldier has at their disposal an unprecedented amount of advanced kit designed to boost both lethality and survivability. Julian Turner takes a closer look at the latest in soldier systems from head to toe, including helmets, vision, body armour, clothing, and leading-edge smart devices. Read the article.

The long reign of the B-52

In service continually since the 1950s, the B-52 is the US Air Force’s king of the skies, having operated in almost every US conflict since it first took flight. Harry Lye looks back on the history of the Stratofortress. Read the article.

Next issue preview

At the beginning of a new decade, and having just reached 70 years in existence, NATO is facing a defence landscape that has changed significantly since the alliance’s formation. We hear from NATO leaders and think-tankers about the new threats and challenges facing the NATO, and how the alliance is preparing for them.

We also find out how the US is testing its NATO readiness with the largest deployment of US forces to Europe in 20 years, hear from IFS about the benefits of electrification and renewable power initiatives for operations and logistics support, and ask whether manned tanks have a future in the increasingly automated land domain.

Plus, we analyse what the US-Iran crisis could mean for the defence sector, speak to Women in Defence award winner Phillippa Spencer about her work for the UK’s Dstl, and find out how Tech Against Terrorism is uncovering terrorist content online.

Subscribe to be notified when the next issue of GDT is available.

Visit our archive to read past issues for free.

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Free Report
img

What is driving and impacting South Korea’s Defense Market?

South Korea’s defense budget is currently valued at $48.3 billion after experiencing impressive and robust annual growth of 10.5% in 2022. Over the forecast period, South Korean defense expenditure is anticipated to register a strong CAGR of 6.3% over 2023-27 and reach $66.2 billion by 2027. The country’s acquisition budget, which includes research and development (R&D) funding, is also anticipated to register significant growth, projected to reach $21.6 billion in 2027, seeing significant rise from the anticipated $17 billion in 2023. South Korean defense spending is continuing to be fueled by the country’s hostile relationship with North Korea, coupled with the need to develop its own domestic industry. If you want to strategize successfully off this growing market, it is important to be fully informed. This report’s key findings include:
  • Details on the defense budget
  • Drivers of defense spending
  • Key trends impacting the market
Download the full report so you can formulate winning strategies for the road ahead.
by GD50 ADS
Enter your details here to receive your free Report.

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