USAF's F-15E Strike Eagle to receive radar upgrade from Boeing


The US Air Force (USAF) has announced that Seymour Johnson Air Force Base's fleet of F-15E Strike Eagle aircraft will receive a radar upgrade from Boeing.

Under the contract, Boeing will upgrade radar systems of more than 90 Strike Eagles at the air base.

Work under the project includes the replacement of existing APG-70 mechanically-scanned radar with a new active electronically scanned radar system, APG-82.

Expected to be completed in seven to nine years, the radar modernisation programme will improve the dual-role fighter aircraft’s air-to-air and air-to-ground radar, by making it significantly more capable.

Boeing F-15E site lead Jonathan Pierce said: “Once we get the aircraft up on jacks, we get the nose landing gear removed; [my team] starts removing those components and making room for the fabric guys and gals to come in and begin modification by cutting holes, installing or removing brackets, and setting up lines for re-install.

“At the same time our avionics, electric and environmental folks are running all kinds of wiring and pulling out a lot of the old parts that will get replaced.

"When that’s all done, we put it all back together and do our follow-on [operations] checks.”

"Expected to be completed in seven to nine years, the radar modernisation programme will improve the dual-role fighter aircraft’s air-to-air and air-to-ground radar."

The new radar system has been designed to provide expanded mission employment capabilities such as near simultaneous interleaving of selected air-to-air and air-to-ground functions and enhanced air-to-air and air-to-ground combat identification capabilities.

It also provides longer range air-to-air target detection and enhanced track capabilities, as well as longer range and higher resolution air-to-ground radar mapping and improved ground moving target track capability.

Upon completion of radar modifications, a quality assurance check will be conducted to conclude the acceptance process.


Image: An engineer working on a F-15E. Photo: courtesy of US Air Force photo by Airman Shawna L. Keyes.