German Air Force to equip Tornado fleet with Saab's self-protection systems


Tornado aircraft

Saab has been awarded three contracts for the supply of self-protection equipment for installation onboard the German Air Force's (Luftwaffe) Tornado combat aircraft fleet.
 
Valued at a combined SEK100m ($15m), the contracts cover certification and limited production of the BOZ-101 EC podded self-protection system, including the MAW-300 missile approach warning system, and the development and qualification of a new cockpit control unit for the pod.
 
The equipment is scheduled to be installed on both of the Luftwaffe's Tornado interdictor/strike (IDS) and electronic combat/reconnaissance (ECR) variants, which are anticipated to remain in service for several years to come.
 
Saab Electronic Defence System business area head Micael Johansson said the orders represent the first contract with Germany for Saab's MAW-300 missile approach warning system.
 
''It is a breakthrough and a strong vote of confidence in Saab as an electronic warfare supplier," Johansson said.

"The equipment is scheduled to be installed on both of the Luftwaffe's Tornado interdictor/strike and electronic combat/reconnaissance variants."

The BOZ EC family of pods is designed to provide integrated missile warning and cocktail flare dispensing capabilities to the Tornado fleet to eventually help the aircraft defeat advanced threats.

The BOZ-102 EC pod has been in operational use within the Italian Air Force (ITAF) since 2008.
 
Powered by two Turbo-Union RB199-34R Mk 103 turbofan engines, the Tornado is a variable-sweep wing combat aircraft being developed by Panavia, a consortium of Alenia Aeronautica, EADS and BAE Systems in three primary variants for air strike missions.
 
The aircraft is also operated by the air forces of Italy, Saudi Arabia and the UK.
 
Development and production work under the contract is scheduled to be primarily carried out at the company's facilities in Jarfalla, Sweden, and Centurion in South Africa, while delivery schedule remain undisclosed.


Image: A German Air Force's Tornado interdictor/strike aircraft during its flight. Photo: courtesy of USAF Master Sgt. Kevin J. Gruenwald.

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