Beijing and Washington agree on air-to-air intercepts rules


The US and China have reportedly agreed on military rules concerning air-to-air intercepts.

Beijing and Washington agreed on the new set of rules following the talks between US President Barack Obama and Chinese President Xi Jinping, Reuters reported.

Announced in November last year, the new rules of behaviour for safety of air-to-air encounters are aimed to reduce the chance of an accidental flare-up between the two counties.

"We agreed to new channels of communication to reduce the risks of miscalculations between our militaries."

During a White House news conference, the news agency reported Obama as saying: "We agreed to new channels of communication to reduce the risks of miscalculations between our militaries."

The draft of the agreement stated that both sides recognise the importance of sustained channels of communication and share a commitment to eliminate misunderstanding and miscalculation.

The agreement also states that it is aimed to prevent unintended incidents or crisis from harming the overall relationship.

The US reported interception of two Chinese JH-7 fighter jets on 15 September about 80m east of the Shandong peninsula in the Yellow Sea.

In August last year, the Pentagon spotted a Chinese warplane flying as close as 20ft to 30ft near a US Navy patrol jet.

The new agreement addresses covers various topics starting from correct radio frequencies to use during distress calls to the wrong physical behaviours to use during crises.