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AAI to provide C-17 maintenance training for UAE

27 April 2012

C-17 Globemaster

AAI Logistics & Technical Services has been awarded a contract by the United Arab Emirates' (UAE) Advanced Military Maintenance Repair Overhaul Centre (AMMROC) to provide C-17 Globemaster maintenance training.

The AMMROC is a joint venture company owned by Mubadala Aerospace, Sikorsky Aircraft and Lockheed Martin.

Under the contract, AAI will train the AMMROC mechanical and avionics technicians, which will include classroom training with modular C-17 maintenance training courseware.

AMMROC trainees will also be provided hands-on instruction with the aircraft by AAI instructors.

AAI Logistics and Technical Services general manager and senior vice president Diane Giuliani said that the comprehensive, affordable and easy to implement, C-17 maintenance training courseware has been designed specifically for maintainers.

"These include both former U.S. Air Force instructors and former C-17 maintenance training instructors. They understand the role and the aircraft, and can provide unique insights on how to get the job done."

The company has also provided five years of courseware and instruction in C-17 maintenance training for the UK Royal Air Force, and is currently providing the same for the Royal Australian Air Force.

The Boeing C-17 Globemaster III is a large military transport aircraft designed to conduct rapid strategic airlift of troops and palleted cargo to main operating bases or forward operating bases throughout the world.

The C-17 airlifter can be configured to perform tactical airlifts, medical evacuation and airdrop missions as well as to help with humanitarian and disaster relief efforts.

The aircraft is also widely operated by the air forces of the US, Australia, India, Canada, Qatar, UAE and the 12-member Strategic Airlift Capability initiative of Nato and Partnership for Peace nations.

Image: Boeing's C-17 Globemaster III flies over the US Air Force Academy cadet area in Colorado Springs, Colorado. Photo: Dennis Rogers.