Global Defence Technology: Issue 36

In this issue: We discover a new type of cyber hacking that is teaching security teams to expect the unexpected, we ask when soldiers will be wearing solar technology, we learn how defence can be made greener and much more.


Global Defence Technology Issue 35 13 February 2014

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With defence organisations worldwide spending millions on the development of wearable solar technology, have we come any closer to seeing deployed soldiers with solar power systems? We take a look at the latest progress in this field and the challenges to be overcome.

As demand for bandwidth on military satellites is outweighing what is currently available, we ask whether the commercial sector can deliver additional capacity for non-critical communications. We also find out how militaries can address sustainability in a wider context, take a look at the crucial role of helicopter external load missions, and review the US Pentagon's naval strategy for the Arctic region.

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In this issue

Stranger Dangers
A new type of cyber attack that appears immune to all conventional defences made headlines recently. It is not considered a threat to the population at large but, as Berenice Baker finds out, has taught security experts a valuable lesson.
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Defining Green Defence
A recent conference hosted by the Danish embassy highlighted that the green credentials of defence solutions can be defined in a far wider range of ways and an international context. Berenice Baker finds out more.
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Wearing Solar
Defence organisations across the world have spent millions trying to develop wearable solar technology for soldiers in the field. But how close are we to seeing such systems deployed? Grant Turnbull investigates.
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Heavy Duty
From their inception helicopters were designed to lift heavy loads externally and drop them off in hard to reach areas. Grant Turnbull finds out more about external load operations and how they can be carried out safely.
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Commercial Solutions
A growth in network-centric capabilities has driven demand for satellite bandwidth beyond what is available. Grant Turnbull finds out why militaries are increasingly looking to the commercial sector to meet their needs.
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A Frosty Reception
In November 2013, US Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel set out the Pentagon's new Arctic strategy. With no significant action having been taken since then, Grant Turnbull finds out whether the proposals can be taken seriously.
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Colossal Construction
In just four years, workers at Newport News Shipbuilding in Virginia, US, have built a carrier of mammoth proportions. Grant Turnbull takes a look at CVN-78 USS Gerald R. Ford.
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Next Issue

The shape of ground warfare is set to change radically over the next few decades under the influence of factors as diverse as climate change, changing population demographics and new sources of energy. We find out about the major drivers of conflict to 2040 and explore new military technologies that could come to the fore during that time.

We also investigate new cyber threats against military satellite systems, take a look at the next generation of radically designed helicopters that can fly higher and faster than ever, and even without a pilot, and profile the world's best main battle tanks. Moreover, we find out about the largest archaeological offshore map of the D-Day beaches ever created and review stunning footage of sunken allied vessels off the Normandy coast.

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